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artchipel:

Kurt Hentschläger (Austria/USA) - CLUSTER (2009-2012)

Generative Audiovisual Live Show. In the weightless choreography of CLUSTER, human figures appear mostly as anonymous particles, a pulsing, amorphous mass, a cloud of blurry matter from body parts and light. By its never fully predictable generative nature, CLUSTER describes a meta-organism with decidedly anti-individualistic character. © Kurt Hentschläger

[more Kurt Hentschlager | artist found at anti-utopias]

(Source: artchipel)

Filed under art theater lighting dance

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artchipel:

Kurt Hentschläger - FEED (2005-06)
Performance for Unreal Characters, Fog, Stroboscopes & Pulse Lights, a creation for the Theater Biennial Venice. FEED is an immersive performance in two parts that stresses the limits of perception. The first half is staged in a classical frontal way with a single, larger than life, projection of figures moving in a synchronized choreography, floating and convulsing in a world without gravity. Their movements generate sounds, creating a symphonic drone. © Kurt Hentschläger

I had the pleasure of meeting Kurt years ago in his studio. He was kind enough to sit with me for and hour or so and explore my silly ideas. Kurt is brilliant - check out his work. 

artchipel:

Kurt Hentschläger - FEED (2005-06)

Performance for Unreal Characters, Fog, Stroboscopes & Pulse Lights, a creation for the Theater Biennial Venice. FEED is an immersive performance in two parts that stresses the limits of perception. The first half is staged in a classical frontal way with a single, larger than life, projection of figures moving in a synchronized choreography, floating and convulsing in a world without gravity. Their movements generate sounds, creating a symphonic drone. © Kurt Hentschläger

I had the pleasure of meeting Kurt years ago in his studio. He was kind enough to sit with me for and hour or so and explore my silly ideas. Kurt is brilliant - check out his work. 

(Source: artchipel, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Filed under art lighting Theater

14 notes

canisfleur:

Just out of Chapter 1 in my Lighting Design text, and I already know this author and I are going to get along famously. 

“Light has an undeniably powerful effect upon our state of mind. Almost nothing has such a direct impact on your emotions.” 

Yes, Pilbrow, I quite agree. Please, tell me more about how my work is not something to overlook, but to be taken into account as much as anything else in a production, and how it’s still art. 

Here’s the thing…you will work with many directors, choreographers and producers in your career the good ones get that every design discipline is important, the lousy ones won’t. 

Filed under Theater design

4 notes

I’ve never served in the military. I have friends and family who have and they all say the same thing, that once you’ve served it changed you forever.

I have a similar feeling for my time in the theater. When I’m really tired, or when I feel like there is too much packed into my week, I’m immediately pulled back only the days of tech weeks and cue sheets.

I still tie clove hitches and carry a Multi-tool on my belt.

Once you’re a theater person you’re always a theater person even if you move on.

Filed under theater

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artsorbit:

A sharp reference to “job creators” in Crispin Whittell’s adaptation of Charles Dickens’s 1843 novel A Christmas Carol underscores the fact that Ebenezer Scrooge’s view of “the surplus population” accords fairly precisely with the perspective of a man who just won 49% of the national vote by arguing that 47% of the population are self-declared “victims who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe they are entitled to health care, to housing, to food, to you-name-it.” Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?
In the wake of our bruising election, Dickens’s impassioned attack on the idea that wealth is a measure of virtue feels as sharp as an episode of The Daily Show. Dickens’s message is nothing new, but in our lifetimes, it’s never been more essential.
THEATER REVIEW | Guthrie Theater’s post-Romney Christmas Carol is eerily resonant

Sometimes even the most well-worn often performed plays can resonate in the wake of current politics.

artsorbit:

A sharp reference to “job creators” in Crispin Whittell’s adaptation of Charles Dickens’s 1843 novel A Christmas Carol underscores the fact that Ebenezer Scrooge’s view of “the surplus population” accords fairly precisely with the perspective of a man who just won 49% of the national vote by arguing that 47% of the population are self-declared “victims who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe they are entitled to health care, to housing, to food, to you-name-it.” Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?

In the wake of our bruising election, Dickens’s impassioned attack on the idea that wealth is a measure of virtue feels as sharp as an episode of The Daily Show. Dickens’s message is nothing new, but in our lifetimes, it’s never been more essential.

THEATER REVIEW | Guthrie Theater’s post-Romney Christmas Carol is eerily resonant

Sometimes even the most well-worn often performed plays can resonate in the wake of current politics.

Filed under theater Christmas carol